Understanding Invoice Lending and How it Works

01:32 09 May in Blog, Business Funding

When you have a need for cash, and you prefer to not borrow money, one option is to get a cash advance on your invoices. Invoice lending, more commonly referred to as factoring, is used by small and medium-sized businesses to help meet their cash flow needs.

How Invoice Lending Works

Invoice lending allows you to provide product to your customers on credit. Once the product has been delivered and the customer has been billed, you can submit the invoice to a factoring company and get cash based on the face value of the invoice.

This method of financing allows you to offer credit terms to your customers, get the cash you need before the 30, 60, or 90-day terms you have offered your customers and turn over the collection of the invoice to the factoring company.

Another advantage of invoice lending is that you typically can determine which invoices you want to factor. Whether you wish to consider factoring a single client, or a specific group of clients, most invoice factoring companies offer that flexibility.

Time to Obtain Funds

One of the most common reasons why a company would use invoice lending is the time between submitting invoices and obtaining funds. In most cases, you can submit an invoice and receive cash within a few business days. This can be helpful to a small or medium-sized business owner who needs immediate cash to make payroll or pay monthly bills.

Unlike a bank loan, or lines of credit which can take weeks to get approved, business owners can get a nearly immediate advance on their accounts receivable. Once your invoice has been approved by the factoring company, you will get a percentage of the face value of your invoice.

Collections of Balance Due on Invoices

When you borrow money against an invoice, you are no longer responsible for collecting the payment for the invoice. The factoring company who made the cash advance will follow up on collections. Once your customer has paid the invoice in full, the balance of the invoice, less the factoring fee will be released to you. Typically, payments will be redirected to a lockbox controlled by the factoring company.

What Type of Companies are Eligible?

One of the many challenges businesses face is having sufficient funding for their day-to-day operations. While banks, and other traditional lenders tend to focus on businesses who have been around for a while, with regular cash flow, a factoring company is often willing to accept more risk. This is because they are loaning you money based on a specific asset, namely your invoices.

Because of how factoring companies work, more businesses are typically eligible for this type of lending. Subcontractors including electricians, staffing agencies, architects and more can benefit from invoice lending. Other types of businesses that often use invoice lending to maintain a steady cash flow include manufacturers, contractors, and suppliers.

Improvement in Cash Flow

Some business owners are faced with seasonal swings in business revenue. This can often result in them being unable to take on new contracts because they do not have the cash flow needed to fund materials for a new customer. Invoice lending can help business owners who are facing a temporary cash flow problem meet their obligations and take on new contracts.

If you are concerned about the cash flow outlook for your business, contact Capstone Capital Group by email at [email protected] or by phone at 347-410-9697. We are a private finance company offering numerous solutions to help small and medium-sized businesses meet their cash flow needs.

Understanding the Typical Types of Factoring

09:13 04 May in Blog, Business Funding

Factoring is a financing arrangement that is typically used by small and medium-sized businesses to help them maintain a steady cash flow. As every business owner understands, cash flow is important to ensure the successful, continuous operation of their business. This is why it’s important to know the different types of factoring.

In general, factoring means a company is turning over their invoices to a third party in return for receiving a portion of those invoices in cash within a few business days. Primarily, there are two types of factoring, recourse factoring and non-recourse factoring.

What is Recourse Factoring?

As a business owner, you are assuming a certain risk when you extend credit to a customer. Typically, the more reliable a client, the more favorable the terms you are offering. Some businesses even offer a discount if a client pays more rapidly. This type of factoring is called recourse factoring.

In fact, it is common for a company to issue an invoice with two separate terms such as offering a 5 percent discount if paid in 15 days and a 90-day net pricing. This means the client has 90 days to pay the invoice in full. Should the client not pay their bill in full at this time, the company would then begin collection activities which may involve refusing to ship additional product, having their accounts receivable department call the company about payment and in some cases, adding on a fee for late payment.

When customers refuse to pay, the business may turn over the collection activity to a collection agent or attorney.

However, if the business has opted to finance the invoice with a factoring company, they no longer must be concerned about collecting payment for the invoice.

The factoring company takes over the risk associated with the invoice, and the client is indebted to them. Om return, your business receives a portion of the face value of the invoice and the balance is held by the factoring company until the company pays the invoice. If the company fails to pay the invoice, the factoring company may ask you to substitute another invoice of similar value in its place.

This is known as recourse factoring.

What is Non-Recourse Factoring?

In some instances when a company borrows money, they are putting up assets such as equipment, real estate, or equity in the business. This allows the lender to seize, and in some instances, liquidate the asset to make themselves whole.

If the agreement between the borrower and lender calls for “no recourse” it means the lender has no option to turn to the business owner for any shortfall between what the company owed the lender, and what the liquidated assets provided.

In the case of non-recourse factoring, however, there is a slightly different meaning. When you deliver product to a customer, you do so under the belief the company will still be in business when the invoice comes due in 30, 60 or 90 days.

However, if you have factored that invoice, the factoring company is assuming that risk since they have given you a portion of the face value of the invoice up front. Should the company go out of business, and you have a non-recourse contract with the factoring company, the company will absorb that loss without any financial repercussions falling on your company. Non-recourse factoring typically only protects you and your business in the event your customer closes their doors before they pay their invoice.

If you are considering entering into any type of factoring contract, it is important to determine what your liability is should other problems occur with your customer. If the contract is non-recourse, talk to the factor to determine how they define non-recourse factoring.

At Capstone Capital Group, we work with small and medium-sized businesses to help them solve their cash flow problems. Contact us today and let’s discuss your needs and discuss your options for recourse, or non-recourse factoring.

An Overview of Factoring Agreements

09:00 01 May in Blog, Business Funding

Factoring agreements are designed to ensure a company who is using their accounts receivable as collateral, and the company who is accepting them as collateral, have a mutual understanding of their obligations. Like any other contract, factoring agreements are legal documents and are binding on all parties. Depending on the depth of your agreement with a factoring company, you will find the following information:

Sales of Receivables

This section of the agreement will include information on what agreement you have with the factoring company pertaining to what receivables will be included in the agreement. You should pay attention to this section, so you understand what you are agreeing to. For example, if you have agreed to only certain invoices, you do not want this section to be a “blanket” sales of accounts.

Credit Approvals and Withdrawals

This part of the contract will state what the company expects from you in terms of documentation to support an invoice. The factoring company may also have specific requirements you must meet if you want to change the terms offered to a company you are factoring invoices for.

Invoicing Assignments

This section of your contract will specify how you are to deal with payment for invoices you have assigned to the factor. Language must be included on the invoice issued to the client indicating they are to make payment to a lockbox controlled by the factor.

Fees and Commissions

There may be one or more sections of the contract that explain what fees and commissions are due to the factor. Before signing any factoring agreement, make sure you understand all the fees and commissions involved.

Advance Information

Your contract should specify how much the factor will advance against invoices. There may be different amounts for specific customers’ credit levels, and there may also be a maximum you may be allowed to have outstanding at any given time. This portion of your agreement should be reviewed carefully to ensure you understand the limits of the advance the factor is granting.

Warranties and Representations

You will be required to acknowledge that your company is duly authorized to do business, that you are solvent enough to enter into an agreement, and the invoices you are factoring are legitimately owed debts to your company. The factoring company will make similar warranties about their solvency and authorization to enter into a contract with you.

Defaults and Termination of Agreement

This section of the contract deals with when a contract may be terminated, what events could result in your being in default of your contract, and what notices are required to inform the factor of your intent to terminate the contract. This is typically done only when a long-term contract is necessary and may not be included in spot factoring contracts.

Security Interest in Receivables

The contract will spell out the factoring companies interest in your receivables. This section of the contract will prohibit you from factoring the same receivables with another company or using the same receivables as a security interest in any other type of loan arrangement.

Conclusion of Factoring Agreements

Whenever a company has decided to borrow against invoices, there will be a contract involved. Your contract will be unique to the agreement you reach with the factor including what the term of the contract is, what fees are paid, and what will occur should your client default on an invoice. Be sure you understand the terms and conditions you are agreeing to.

If you are considering working with a factoring company to help improve your cash flow, contact Capstone Capital Group today. You can reach us by filling out our online contact form, by calling us at 347-410-9894, or by email at [email protected]

Understanding Non Recourse Factoring

12:21 16 April in Blog, Business Funding

Like any type of financing, accounts receivable factoring is a risk taken by the factoring company. In most cases, accounts receivable factoring is based on the creditworthiness of the underlying customer. Therefore, a factoring company does not provide financing for invoices that are made to an individual customer, instead they provide funding against invoices made to other companies, or to government entities. This is why we need to understand non recourse factoring.

Collection Activities and B2B Transactions

Typically, when businesses are completing transactions, they offer terms that may give a company up to 90 days to make payment.

In some instances, they offer discounts if an invoice is paid sooner. In the case where a company has opted to factor their accounts receivable, they turn the risk, and collection activities over to the factoring company. However, what happens when the customer does not pay their invoice?

If a company is managing their own accounts receivable, they may put forward demand notices, and hold the company responsible for paying the invoice with certain late charges which are normally laid out in their contract. Many contracts also have a recourse clause which may hold the company owners accountable personally for unpaid bills.

If payments are not made as agreed, you would typically stop doing business with the company until the invoice was paid in full. Chances are, you would likely require a deposit or full payment before doing additional business with the company. This is known as full recourse.

Meaning of Non Recourse Factoring

But, what happens if you are working with a factor and they have offered to factor your receivables with no recourse?

First, it is important to understand what no recourse means. In most factoring contracts, no recourse usually means that the factoring company will not seek payment from you under certain conditions.

The typical condition is the insolvency of the customer that occurs during the time of the factoring period.

For example, if you have issued an invoice that is due in 90 days, and a factoring company has advanced you cash against that invoice, the company would have to go out of business during the 90 day period between issuing the invoice and having the payment due.

What Non Recourse Factoring Does Not Cover

Even if your factoring company has agreed to factor your receivables without recourse, there are certain exclusions which you should be aware of. For example, in most cases, factoring advances will not be considered without recourse if:

  • There is a dispute over an invoice – if you have issued an invoice and your customer disputes the invoice, chances are, the factoring company will not allow you to walk away from the debt you incurred because of factoring.
  • You deliver products to non-paying customers – if you have a customer who has been consistently late paying invoices and you are still delivering product to them, you are increasing their outstanding amount owed, meaning the factoring company is at even more risk of losing money. Most of the time, you will be held responsible for these invoices.
  • You owe the company money – if you have a reciprocal arrangement with a company you do business with, and the company credits amounts you owe them against amounts they owe you, the factoring company may not grant you the ability to factor those invoices without recourse.

When entering into a factoring contract, it is important to understand the terms you are agreeing to abide by.

We make sure our contracts are easy to understand and you understand whether you are accepting funding against your receivables with or without recourse.

Capstone is a private finance company offering various solutions to businesses to provide them with more consistent cash flow.

Contact us today to request funding or to speak with one of our representatives to learn more about how Capstone can help your business grow and flourish.

Factoring Decision

When Factoring is the Right Decision

14:20 05 September in Blog, Business Funding

Some business owners are uncomfortable about the idea of factoring their invoices; however, they are more uncomfortable about taking on debt. This means when a company is facing a cash flow problem, wants to hire additional staff members, or needs material to fulfill a large order, they may not know where to turn. One of the first things to do is identify the problem, determine what you need, and then find a solution.

Problem: Short-Term Cash Flow Problems

Immediate business expenses, such as rent, utilities, and payroll cannot be ignored. Let’s face it, if you are unable to pay your employees, you stand a chance of closing your doors; most people are not willing to wait until you get paid to get their paycheck. Your options are limited; you need a way to get immediate cash to meet your obligations.

Your solutions include borrowing money from your local bank, taking a cash advance against your credit cards, or factoring your invoices. Borrowing money from your bank, unless you have an existing line of credit, is time consuming and will likely not occur fast enough to assist you. Credit card advances are seldom a good idea; you will pay high upfront costs for the privilege, and the overall interest rate could be as high as 25 percent. This means factoring is likely your best option and here is why:

  • You can use spot factoring – business owners need not turn over all their accounts receivable for immediate cash needs. Instead, you have the option to factor only sufficient invoices to meet your immediate needs.
  • Timely cash disbursement – generally, receiving cash against your invoices occurs within a few business days. This can be very helpful if you need to have cash. Unlike a bank loan, once you have signed the proper documents, and have your invoices approved, you will have the cash you need to meet your obligations. Since factoring does not involve a bank loan, your company does not incur any additional debt.
  • Cost effective solution – unlike credit cards where you pay a fee to access cash, or loans where you may have to pay application, and other fees, factoring is a cost-effective solution. You can collect on your accounts receivable before they are due, and you pay a fee to the factor. Businesses of all sizes, and in all industries, have used this method of getting working capital when they are facing short-term cash flow problems.

Problem: Long-Term cash Flow Issues

Spot factoring is the ideal solution when your cash flow issues are temporary. However, some businesses have ongoing issues maintaining a sufficient cash balance to meet their obligations. In these cases, options are more limited; options include bank lines of credit, reducing the terms you offer customers, or factoring your accounts receivable. It is important to understand the pros and cons of each option.

While bank lines of credit can be helpful, you will have to accept the fact your company will be in debt. To compound this, chances are, if you seem to be facing regular cash flow issues, it may be very expensive, and potentially impossible to get a loan, or line of credit. Banks typically look for a strong balance sheet, excellent cash flow, and a proven track record. This means if you have a start-up, you may not have the option.

Reducing your customer terms is risky; if your customer base is accustomed to a 30, 60, or 90-day period to pay invoices, and you cut the time in half, or begin a cash-only process, you could negatively impact your bottom line. This means, over the long-term, your cash flow will be worse, not better.

Using accounts receivable factoring, can provide you the long-term solution you need. In effect, you reach an agreement with the factor, and they take over the collection of your accounts receivable. There is an added benefit to this as well; since you do not have to worry about collections, you can focus your efforts on building your business. Rather than having a staff member dealing with collections, you can use their talents elsewhere; this can provide numerous benefits for your business.

Nearly every business will face a cash-flow problem at some time; particularly in the early stages. Some businesses need short-term cash solutions because of seasonal business swings, or because they have just landed a significant contract. Think about the possibilities; and if you think that factoring may be the right decision to help you meet your cash-flow needs, contact Capstone Capital Group by phone at 347-410-9697 or by email at [email protected] and see how we can help you find unique funding solutions.

About US Manufacturing - Capstone Financing

4 Things You Didn’t Know about US Manufacturing

09:37 15 July in Blog

As we discussed in a recent blog, US manufacturing is alive and well—despite what many people may think. Following up on that piece, we are happy to give yet another positive update from the manufacturing sector.

The stars have aligned for US manufacturing in July, with domestic demand strengthening and offsetting the relative strength of the US dollar. US manufacturing activity hit a 9-month high in July, dispelling fears that the UK’s decision to leave the EU would hurt the already poorly performing sector. Factors that are boosting US manufacturing activity include a strong housing market, strong automobile demand, and solid consumer spending: all of which help to increase spending on manufactured goods.

US Manufacturing: Down and Out or Just Different?

It’s true that today’s manufacturing landscape is quite different from that of 1950. It’s even changed significantly since the year 2000, having shed 5 million jobs since the turn of the century. But what many people don’t realize is that it’s not only US manufacturing that’s being transformed. Technological advancements have made it possible to increase production with fewer workers. The end result is a strong (albeit much quieter) manufacturing sector that increasingly relies on tools like invoice factoring to increase working capital and expand business.

Surprising Facts about US Manufacturing

Here are four things you probably didn’t know about US manufacturing.

  1. Most US manufacturing firms are small; 75% have less than 20 employees, and 99% have less than 500.
  2. The US boasts 12 million manufacturing workers —9% of the entire workforce
  3. The average manufacturing worker earned over $4 more an hour than the US average — $25.58 compared to $21.32.
  4. Many manufacturing companies use invoice factoring to boost cash flow and expand their business

Boosting Working Capital with Capstone

For qualified clients, Capstone provides single invoice and contractor factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage or contact us directly for more information.

Stake for Small Business Owners this Election Season

What’s at Stake for Small Business Owners this Election Season

19:40 29 June in Blog

Stake for Small Business Owners this Election SeasonU.S. presidential elections are a marathon, not a sprint, and this race has been exceptionally grueling—both for the candidates and the public at large. But more concerned than the average U.S. citizen are small business owners, who have responded to the uncertainty by delaying new hires, forgoing new equipment orders, and avoiding all but the most essential investments. We’ll tell you why confidence is slipping and what small businesses can do to buck the trend.

An Unprecedented Election Season?

Every presidential election captures the nation’s attention, but this year’s race seems to have no precedent. Whereas most Americans tune into the race after the primaries are over and the Republicans and Democrats have chosen their respective nominees, both parties saw unconventional candidates challenge the status quo during the primaries and capture the attention—and votes—of millions. Now that the primaries are over and Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are set to face off in the general election, the future and the direction we’re heading remains as unclear as ever.

Small Business Owners Uncertain

According to a survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal and Vistage Worldwide Inc, one-third of business owners report that uncertainty over the coming election is negatively impacting their business.

Though small business owners are responding in different ways, the overarching theme is this: they have opportunities to grow their businesses, but they’re hesitant to spend the money. It’s not just the election causing concerns—there’s also global concerns, like the recent exit of the U.K. from the European Union, which threw global markets into a brief tailspin and the tenuous state of the Chinese economy. Closer to home, there’s also uncertainty over the timing and impact of future interest rate hikes.

Small-Business Confidence, by the Numbers

Given the picture we’ve just painted, it’s no surprise that small-business confidence fell to its lowest level since November of 2012 this month. Even industries that consider themselves ‘immune’ to political drama, like real estate, construction and development, are seeing activity dwindle. In the end, small businesses off all types face higher cost of capital than their larger counterparts, and that’s why they bear the lion’s share of the burden when uncertainty prevails and consumers reduce spending.

Luckily, there are several tools that small businesses can use to seize opportunities for growth—regardless of the prevailing political and economic climate.

Capstone Helps Small Businesses Boost Working Capital and Grow

For qualified clients, Capstone provides purchase order factoring, single invoice factoring, and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage or contact us directly for more information.

How to Grow Business in an Unnatural Economy - Capstone

How to Grow Business in an Unnatural Economy

21:58 15 June in Blog

How to Grow Business in an Unnatural EconomyStalled growth, disappearing jobs and a sense of foreboding are the defining characteristics of today’s economy. So, what or who is to blame? According to one theorist, the process of “creative destructions,” whereby the death of one business or industry gives rise to another, is failing. We’ll tell you why it’s happening and show you how Capstone’s single invoice and full-contract factoring allow businesses to grow along with demand, avoid taking on additional debt, and improve their balance sheets organically—even in an economy stuck in limbo.

The Numbers

A sobering job report released earlier this month showed the creation of only 38,000 new jobs —124,000 fewer than had been predicted — which is the lowest monthly total since September 2010. Furthermore, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 94,708 Americans were not participating in the labor force during the month of May, bringing the participation rate to 62.6%.

A Limited Recovery

There’s no doubt that we’ve recovered from the Great Recession. The stock market has been on a 7-year bull run—although it has been tested recently. If you’ve tuned into the rhetoric coming out of the presidential race, you’ve heard the conviction that the recovery has been rather one-sided—that the gains of the last 7 years have benefitted a select few while the majority of the population has been left on the sidelines. No matter where you stand politically, the notion of a limited recovery seems to be supported by an analysis of Census Bureau data.

A Tale of Two Counties

According to the Census Bureau, the net increase of new business establishments is just 2.3% since 2010. Compare that with a 6.7% net increase during the 1990 recovery and a 5.6% net increase during the 2000 recovery. What’s worse—over half of the 166,000 new businesses formed in the United States since 2010 are located in just 20 counties. In short, a select few geographic areas are prospering, and the rest of the country is losing businesses and losing jobs at an alarming rate.

Aggressive Oversight and Misplaced Regulation

Touted as the culprits of the financial crash, banks and financial institutions, the drivers of growth since time immemorial, have been forced to tighten their lending requirements. The unintended consequence, of course, is that businesses’ traditional sources of credit have dried up. An enduring irony of the Dodd-Frank Act, which among other things was designed to limit the size of financial institutions, is that its burdensome requirements have actually forced many small community banks out of business—making the Big Banks BIGGER, not smaller.

If a lack of funding weren’t bad enough, businesses are now contending with rising federal regulatory compliance costs and state licensing requirements. And here the bitter irony continues. The new wave of regulations have disproportionally harmed small businesses—the symbol of the American Dream and American industriousness—not the large corporations the regulations were meant to control. A report ordered by the U.S. Small Business Administration found that the per-employee cost of federal regulatory compliance was $10,585 for companies with 19 or fewer employees. Companies with 500 or more employees, by contrast, paid an average of $7,755 per employee to stay compliant. Added to compliance costs are a rapidly multiplying number of state and local licensing requirements. 5% of employees required certificates or licenses in 1950. Today, the number stands at 30%.

A Metaphor for our Economic Ecosystem

There are many apt metaphors that describe what’s happening to the U.S. economy, but one of our favorites has to do with Smoky the Bear and forest fire prevention. Forest fires aren’t pretty, but they’re a natural and necessary phenomenon. They clear away the old, dead wood and give new generations of plants the space they need to grow. If the old, dead wood remains propped up for too long, the ecosystem ends up with less growth, less diversity, and a few individuals soaking up all the sunlight. And when a fire does finally come along, it’s much bigger and more destructive than it ever needed to be.

Boost Working Capital with Capstone

Capstone gives small and midsize businesses that are negatively impacted by Dodd-Frank and other constrictive legislation the working capital needed to seize opportunities for growth. For qualified clients, we provide single invoice factoring, construction factoring and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage for more information.

Interest Rates Predicted to Rise - Capstone Explained

U.S. Economy Picking Up Momentum in Q2; Interest Rates Predicted to Rise

19:56 27 May in Blog

Interest Rates Predicted to Rise - Capstone ExplainedAfter another harsh winter, the American economy is stabilizing and beginning to shrug off concerns of a prolonged slowdown or recession.

According to the latest economic gauges, industrial production is increasing, inflation is firming, and the housing sector is continuing to pick up momentum. All of these factors, combined with data reflecting retail sales rebounds, job gains, and rising consumer confidence, point to improved — though still less than spectacular — growth potential for the second quarter of 2016.

Interest Rates

Fed officials afraid of financial market volatility and poorly performing overseas economies have kept a steady hand on short-term interest rates throughout 2016. A domestic growth rebound in Q2 could be just the inspiration they’ve been looking for to raise rates this summer. Their next opportunities come at the policy meetings scheduled for June, July, and September.

John Williams, President of the San Francisco Fed, recently told the Wall Street Journal that the data is starting to make a strong case for rate increases not just in June, but potentially more than once in the next few policy meetings.

Despite Positives, Some Forecasters Remain Cautious

First quarter 2016 gross domestic product (GDP) increased only 0.5 percent over Q1 2015, but growth might be poised to accelerate.

Since the end of the recession, Q1 GDP growth has consistently been weak, followed by a rebound in Q2. The latest reports of modest but definite growth in highly important sectors would suggest that the same pattern is about to repeat itself in 2016.

Macroeconomic Advisers, a forecasting firm, estimates that GDP will expand at a rate of 2.3 percent this quarter. The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta estimated an even higher growth rate of 2.5 percent.

However, it’s not all sunshine and roses. Despite all the positive data starting to roll in, many forecasters are still leery about the economy’s current health as well as its general outlook for the future. Earlier in May, a Wall Street Journal survey of economists revealed an estimated 20 percent chance of a recession taking place in the U.S. sometime in the next 12 months.

Boost Working Capital with Capstone

For qualified clients, we provide purchase order factoring, single invoice factoring and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. To learn more, please visit our homepage.

Novel Way for Subcontractors to Find Financing from Capstone

A Novel Way for Subcontractors to Find Financing

20:13 11 May in Blog

Novel Way for Subcontractors to Find Financing from Capstone2015 was a picture-perfect year for construction, a banner year for the post-recession. Yet in 2016, many contractors in the United States are struggling to find financing for construction projects.

The lack of financing has been a reality even over the past several years with the economy recovering by leaps and bounds. It was a reality throughout the housing crisis and even prior to the recession when construction and development were booming. Contractor business financing has been a struggle, but it’s clearly nothing new.

Banks’ Aversion to Construction Financing

Banks are perennially gun-shy when it comes to lending to construction firms. They cite the industry’s volatile revenue fluctuations, the unpredictable nature of construction, contractors’ sensitivity to economic cycles, and excess competition as reason to stay away. The recent failure of several prominent construction firms has only strengthened banks’ resolve to avoid offering lines of credit to construction firms, contractors and subcontractors.

Contractors & Underwriting Issues

Steady bank relationships are often out of reach for construction firms with a poor ratio of accounts receivable to accounts payable and limited liquidity in working capital. But when construction firms and contractors struggle to find financing, subcontractors tend to suffer even more. Banks are hesitant to allow subcontractors’ bonded accounts receivable to serve as collateral for lines of credit, and those who primarily engage in bonded work often find it difficult or impossible to provide additional collateral.

Is there any hope for subcontractors in today’s construction industry?

Factoring: A Solution for Subcontractors

Factoring is a finance technique that allows a company to leverage its accounts receivable and accelerate its working capital through the sale of its accounts receivable to a third party. Specifically, a factor gives a business an advance on a customer invoice — generally between 70 to 90% of the invoice amount – so they can create a backlog of work without equity or debt financing. As the company improves their balance sheet, they increase the likelihood of receiving a traditional line of credit from a bank.

Seize Opportunities for Growth with Capstone

For qualified subcontractors, Capstone offers contractor financing and provides a single invoice and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with a creditworthy general contractor. Capstone has highly experienced construction professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of construction-related accounts receivable. To learn more about our contractor business financing and other services, please visit our homepage.

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