An Overview of Factoring Agreements

An Overview of Factoring Agreements

09:00 01 May in Articles, Blog, Business Financing, Business Financing
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Factoring agreements are designed to ensure a company who is using their accounts receivable as collateral, and the company who is accepting them as collateral, have a mutual understanding of their obligations. Like any other contract, factoring agreements are legal documents and are binding on all parties. Depending on the depth of your agreement with a factoring company, you will find the following information:

Sales of Receivables

This section of the agreement will include information on what agreement you have with the factoring company pertaining to what receivables will be included in the agreement. You should pay attention to this section, so you understand what you are agreeing to. For example, if you have agreed to only certain invoices, you do not want this section to be a “blanket” sales of accounts.

Credit Approvals and Withdrawals

This part of the contract will state what the company expects from you in terms of documentation to support an invoice. The factoring company may also have specific requirements you must meet if you want to change the terms offered to a company you are factoring invoices for.

Invoicing Assignments

This section of your contract will specify how you are to deal with payment for invoices you have assigned to the factor. Language must be included on the invoice issued to the client indicating they are to make payment to a lockbox controlled by the factor.

Fees and Commissions

There may be one or more sections of the contract that explain what fees and commissions are due to the factor. Before signing any factoring agreement, make sure you understand all the fees and commissions involved.

Advance Information

Your contract should specify how much the factor will advance against invoices. There may be different amounts for specific customers credit levels, and there may also be a maximum you may be allowed to have outstanding at any given time. This portion of your agreement should be reviewed carefully to ensure you understand the limits of the advance the factor is granting.

Warranties and Representations

You will be required to acknowledge that your company is duly authorized to do business, that you are solvent enough to enter into an agreement, and the invoices you are factoring are legitimately owed debts to your company. The factoring company will make similar warranties about their solvency and authorization to enter into a contract with you.

Defaults and Termination of Agreement

This section of the contract deals with when a contract may be terminated, what events could result in your being in default of your contract, and what notices are required to inform the factor of your intent to terminate the contract. This is typically done only when a long-term contract is necessary and may not be included in spot factoring contracts.

Security Interest in Receivables

The contract will spell out the factoring companies interest in your receivables. This section of the contract will prohibit you factoring the same receivables with another company or using the same receivables as a security interest in any other type of loan arrangement.

Conclusion of Factoring Agreements

Whenever a company has decided to borrow against invoices, there will be a contract involved. Your contract will be unique to the agreement you reach with the factor including what the term of the contract is, what fees are paid, and what will occur should your client default on an invoice. Be sure you understand the terms and conditions you are agreeing to.

If you are considering working with a factoring company to help improve your cash flow, contact Capstone Capital Group today. You can reach us by filling out our online contact form, by calling us at 347-410-9894, or by email at info@capstonetrade.com.