Merchant Cash Advance or Invoice Factoring

10:09 10 March in Blog, Business Funding

One of the options small businesses may turn to for financing immediate cash flow needs is a merchant cash advance (MCA). However, these cash advances can set off a devastating cycle of borrowing which can have catastrophic consequences for a business owner.

While a Merchant Cash Advance, (MCA) can help a business owner secure immediate financing, there are several pitfalls they should be aware of before opting for this type of financing. First, most MCAs are approved based on debit and credit card payments over a specific period. Secondarily, they can be very costly, with APRs (annual percentage rates) as high as triple digits.

MCAs Work But at What Cost?

While in the past all MCAs based advances strictly on debit and credit card transactions, more vendors are offering more flexible options which include all sales. Business owners would submit an application, the vendor will make a proposal to offer a certain amount of cash in advance and payment arrangement will be made. However, there’s more to this than meets the eye.

When using an MCA, the repayment terms typically mean the business owner will pay the advance through daily or weekly payments plus fees. The amount paid is generally based on various factors including the amount borrowed, plus the fees, plus the term of the MCA. Repayment is based on the amount of debit and credit card sales and is debited automatically from those sales. The predicament most business owners face is they have no control over the length of time it may take to repay the MCA — since it is based on new sales, this could mean it takes longer to pay the full amount. Remember, the longer repayment takes, the higher the APR. The other concern is the contracts may be confusing meaning your client may be signing something they do not fully understand.

Why Invoice Factoring Makes More Sense

For nearly every business owner, invoice factoring is a better option. There are several reasons for this including:

  • Easy to understand — contracts for accounts receivable financing are written in a manner which is clear to the customer. Business owners will be able to clearly review their terms and understand exactly what they are paying for fees.
  • Not based on future sales — rather than taking a chance on lower sales in the future, meaning longer repayment times, your clients are getting an advance on existing sales. This is good news because it means APRs are not higher, and they are not dependent on monies not yet earned to get the cash they need.
  • Different type of automatic payment — payments for factored invoice are made by the end client; the one who is paying the invoice. That means your client never has to worry about a weekly or monthly payment to pay back the advance they have received.
  • No impact on other sales — the only funds used to pay off the advance your client has received is the payment on the invoice they have factored. This makes sense because should there come a time when they have a need for additional cash, they can select other client’s invoices to factor.

While MCAs may be valuable for some clients, at Capstone, we believe invoice factoring is a more stable, safer option for nearly every client. Since repayment does not impact future sales, it also allows your clients more flexibility.

Capstone understands every business is different and may have different financing needs. That’s one of the many reasons we are here to offer a customized financial solution to help your client meet their immediate cash flow needs without impeding their future sales. Contact our offices today and let us see if we can help you find the best solution for your client. You can reach one of our highly-trained representatives at (212) 755-3636, you can contact us by email at [email protected] or you can fill out our simple to use online contact form. Let us help you drive your client’s growth and success.

 

Funding Opportunities and Small Business Industry News

10:34 14 January in Blog, Business Funding

As the year approaches the end, it is time to focus on what steps we could be taking to increase business during 2019. On this front, there is plenty of good news for small businesses, particularly those who are designated as minority-owned, those businesses which have a HUBZone designation, or Service-Disabled Veteran Owned.

Increased Government Contracts May be Available

The U.S. Treasury Department recently released information about the potential of increased contracts during Fiscal Year 2019 for businesses with the previously mentioned designations. This is great news for those businesses who wish to start doing business with the federal government since this is a great way to grow your business.

Understanding the Designations

Small businesses may not be aware they could be eligible for prioritization to win government contracts. Here are the descriptions of each of the categories where your business may have priority over other businesses when it comes to bidding, and winning government contracts.

  • Minority-Owned Business — a small business where the ownership is at least 51 percent controlled by a minority population may request minority-owned designation. Minority is defined as those identifying with specific groups including Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American.
  • HUBZone Designated — small businesses located across the United States may be surprised to learn they are in a HUBZone. Currently, the commitment is that at least three percent of all government contracts will be awarded to businesses who fall into this category.
  • Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned — these businesses are owned and operated by one or more veterans who have service-related disabilities. Another important note to be aware of is the day-to-day operations must also be managed by a veteran. Overall, there is a commitment to award three percent of contracts to small businesses meeting this criterion. This is in addition to the commitment made by the Veteran’s Administration utilizing the Veterans First Contracting Program.

Rising Wages, Low Interest, Greater Competition

More small business owners are being forced to consider increasing wages because of the tightening labor markets. However, this is not necessarily bad news since interest rates are still well under control. Thanks to some regulations being modified, there is also a lessening of restrictions on small businesses.

During October of 2018, most small business owners believe it is a good time for them to continue to increase hiring, invest more in their businesses and many have experienced greater sales. While this is all positive, most small business owners still feel access to capital is one of the challenges of operating their small business.

Financing Your Growth

Fortunately, small businesses, particularly those who wish to do business with the government have options. Businesses often need additional resources to place successful bids, which in many cases, may be out of reach for a small business owner either financially, or simply due to a lack of contacts.

Capstone Capital Group can help! We have experience helping small minority-owned businesses get the credit they need to grow their business. We also offer a range of services designed to help you get the resources you need to successfully bid on government contracts.

We have helped with non-legal contract reviews, providing bid support letters, and helping minority-owned businesses get the accounting, estimating, and engineering referrals they need to support their bid.

For more information on Capstone’s diverse funding programs, please contact us at (212) 755-3636 to speak with a representative today. Our highly trained, professional representatives will work with you to obtain a minority business loan and start growing your business today. Let us put our years of experience to work and help you grow your business in 2019.

Understanding Borrowing Against Accounts Receivables

09:00 16 May in Blog, Business Funding

Small and medium-sized businesses often face temporary cash flow problems, especially if they don’t understand borrowing against accounts receivables. The difference in time between issuing an invoice and getting paid for that invoice is often between 30 and 90 days. This delay in receiving payment can result in a business facing challenges purchasing new material for products, meeting payroll obligations, or meeting monthly expenses such as utilities or rent.

In these cases, meeting cash flow requirements is a necessity and businesses often turn to accounts receivable financing as an option. Some business owners avoid this type of financing because they do not understand what it means or how it works.

Accounts Receivable Factoring

There are two separate options a business owner can use to borrow money against their accounts receivable.

One is to work with a factoring company who takes control of your receivables. Using this method, a company delivers products, sends clients their invoices and the factoring company advances the company a portion of their invoices. The client in turn pays the invoice to the factoring company and once payment is received, the factoring company pays the business the balance of the invoice less their fees.

In most cases, this type of factoring involves a long-term contract between the factoring company and the business.

Spot Accounts Receivable Financing

Another common way to get cash against accounts receivable is known as spot factoring. This method of borrowing against accounts receivables is used when a business needs an immediate infusion of cash for any purpose.

For example, a business may have taken on a new contract and needs cash to purchase materials to fulfill that contract. Instead of borrowing money from the bank, the business owner decides to factor one or more of their client’s invoices.

The advantage of this type of financing is the company does not have to have a long-term contract, they get to decide which accounts receivables to factor, and they get the cash they need, typically within a few business days.

Impact on Balance Sheet

One of the reasons a business owner may opt to borrow against their accounts receivable rather than taking out a loan is the impact on their balance sheet.

When a company factors their invoices, they get an infusion of cash which shows as a positive on their balance sheet, and they do not take on any new debt.

The other advantage of accounts receivable financing is a company typically does not have to sacrifice partial ownership of their company to get much-needed capital as they may have to with other types of financing.

Borrowing Against Accounts Receivables Advantages Over Traditional Borrowing

One advantage a company will find when they opt to borrow against accounts receivables is the time it takes to access funds. A traditional factoring situation means a company often has access to cash within a few days of submitting their invoices to the factoring company. With a traditional loan, borrowers can wait weeks, and in some cases, months before getting approval for a loan.

For most company owners, the other advantage of factoring over typical bank loans is restrictions on how funds are used. When a company applies for a bank loan, the bank may place limits on how the funds may be used which can tie the hands of a business owner. You know best what you need funds for and when you borrow money against your accounts receivable, the factoring company typically does not place restrictions on how the funds you receive are used.

Capstone Capital Groups offers a range of accounts receivable financing options for small and medium-size business owners. Contact us today by email at [email protected] or call us at (212) 755-3636 and let us see how we can help you better manage your cash flow by helping you borrow against your accounts receivable.

Understanding Invoice Lending and How it Works

01:32 09 May in Blog, Business Funding

When you have a need for cash, and you prefer to not borrow money, one option is to get a cash advance on your invoices. Invoice lending, more commonly referred to as factoring, is used by small and medium-sized businesses to help meet their cash flow needs.

How Invoice Lending Works

Invoice lending allows you to provide product to your customers on credit. Once the product has been delivered and the customer has been billed, you can submit the invoice to a factoring company and get cash based on the face value of the invoice.

This method of financing allows you to offer credit terms to your customers, get the cash you need before the 30, 60, or 90-day terms you have offered your customers and turn over the collection of the invoice to the factoring company.

Another advantage of invoice lending is that you typically can determine which invoices you want to factor. Whether you wish to consider factoring a single client, or a specific group of clients, most invoice factoring companies offer that flexibility.

Time to Obtain Funds

One of the most common reasons why a company would use invoice lending is the time between submitting invoices and obtaining funds. In most cases, you can submit an invoice and receive cash within a few business days. This can be helpful to a small or medium-sized business owner who needs immediate cash to make payroll or pay monthly bills.

Unlike a bank loan, or lines of credit which can take weeks to get approved, business owners can get a nearly immediate advance on their accounts receivable. Once your invoice has been approved by the factoring company, you will get a percentage of the face value of your invoice.

Collections of Balance Due on Invoices

When you borrow money against an invoice, you are no longer responsible for collecting the payment for the invoice. The factoring company who made the cash advance will follow up on collections. Once your customer has paid the invoice in full, the balance of the invoice, less the factoring fee will be released to you. Typically, payments will be redirected to a lockbox controlled by the factoring company.

What Type of Companies are Eligible?

One of the many challenges businesses face is having sufficient funding for their day-to-day operations. While banks, and other traditional lenders tend to focus on businesses who have been around for a while, with regular cash flow, a factoring company is often willing to accept more risk. This is because they are loaning you money based on a specific asset, namely your invoices.

Because of how factoring companies work, more businesses are typically eligible for this type of lending. Subcontractors including electricians, staffing agencies, architects and more can benefit from invoice lending. Other types of businesses that often use invoice lending to maintain a steady cash flow include manufacturers, contractors, and suppliers.

Improvement in Cash Flow

Some business owners are faced with seasonal swings in business revenue. This can often result in them being unable to take on new contracts because they do not have the cash flow needed to fund materials for a new customer. Invoice lending can help business owners who are facing a temporary cash flow problem meet their obligations and take on new contracts.

If you are concerned about the cash flow outlook for your business, contact Capstone Capital Group by email at [email protected] or by phone at 347-410-9697. We are a private finance company offering numerous solutions to help small and medium-sized businesses meet their cash flow needs.

Understanding the Typical Types of Factoring

09:13 04 May in Blog, Business Funding

Factoring is a financing arrangement that is typically used by small and medium-sized businesses to help them maintain a steady cash flow. As every business owner understands, cash flow is important to ensure the successful, continuous operation of their business. This is why it’s important to know the different types of factoring.

In general, factoring means a company is turning over their invoices to a third party in return for receiving a portion of those invoices in cash within a few business days. Primarily, there are two types of factoring, recourse factoring and non-recourse factoring.

What is Recourse Factoring?

As a business owner, you are assuming a certain risk when you extend credit to a customer. Typically, the more reliable a client, the more favorable the terms you are offering. Some businesses even offer a discount if a client pays more rapidly. This type of factoring is called recourse factoring.

In fact, it is common for a company to issue an invoice with two separate terms such as offering a 5 percent discount if paid in 15 days and a 90-day net pricing. This means the client has 90 days to pay the invoice in full. Should the client not pay their bill in full at this time, the company would then begin collection activities which may involve refusing to ship additional product, having their accounts receivable department call the company about payment and in some cases, adding on a fee for late payment.

When customers refuse to pay, the business may turn over the collection activity to a collection agent or attorney.

However, if the business has opted to finance the invoice with a factoring company, they no longer must be concerned about collecting payment for the invoice.

The factoring company takes over the risk associated with the invoice, and the client is indebted to them. Om return, your business receives a portion of the face value of the invoice and the balance is held by the factoring company until the company pays the invoice. If the company fails to pay the invoice, the factoring company may ask you to substitute another invoice of similar value in its place.

This is known as recourse factoring.

What is Non-Recourse Factoring?

In some instances when a company borrows money, they are putting up assets such as equipment, real estate, or equity in the business. This allows the lender to seize, and in some instances, liquidate the asset to make themselves whole.

If the agreement between the borrower and lender calls for “no recourse” it means the lender has no option to turn to the business owner for any shortfall between what the company owed the lender, and what the liquidated assets provided.

In the case of non-recourse factoring, however, there is a slightly different meaning. When you deliver product to a customer, you do so under the belief the company will still be in business when the invoice comes due in 30, 60 or 90 days.

However, if you have factored that invoice, the factoring company is assuming that risk since they have given you a portion of the face value of the invoice up front. Should the company go out of business, and you have a non-recourse contract with the factoring company, the company will absorb that loss without any financial repercussions falling on your company. Non-recourse factoring typically only protects you and your business in the event your customer closes their doors before they pay their invoice.

If you are considering entering into any type of factoring contract, it is important to determine what your liability is should other problems occur with your customer. If the contract is non-recourse, talk to the factor to determine how they define non-recourse factoring.

At Capstone Capital Group, we work with small and medium-sized businesses to help them solve their cash flow problems. Contact us today and let’s discuss your needs and discuss your options for recourse, or non-recourse factoring.

An Overview of Factoring Agreements

09:00 01 May in Blog, Business Funding

Factoring agreements are designed to ensure a company who is using their accounts receivable as collateral, and the company who is accepting them as collateral, have a mutual understanding of their obligations. Like any other contract, factoring agreements are legal documents and are binding on all parties. Depending on the depth of your agreement with a factoring company, you will find the following information:

Sales of Receivables

This section of the agreement will include information on what agreement you have with the factoring company pertaining to what receivables will be included in the agreement. You should pay attention to this section, so you understand what you are agreeing to. For example, if you have agreed to only certain invoices, you do not want this section to be a “blanket” sales of accounts.

Credit Approvals and Withdrawals

This part of the contract will state what the company expects from you in terms of documentation to support an invoice. The factoring company may also have specific requirements you must meet if you want to change the terms offered to a company you are factoring invoices for.

Invoicing Assignments

This section of your contract will specify how you are to deal with payment for invoices you have assigned to the factor. Language must be included on the invoice issued to the client indicating they are to make payment to a lockbox controlled by the factor.

Fees and Commissions

There may be one or more sections of the contract that explain what fees and commissions are due to the factor. Before signing any factoring agreement, make sure you understand all the fees and commissions involved.

Advance Information

Your contract should specify how much the factor will advance against invoices. There may be different amounts for specific customers’ credit levels, and there may also be a maximum you may be allowed to have outstanding at any given time. This portion of your agreement should be reviewed carefully to ensure you understand the limits of the advance the factor is granting.

Warranties and Representations

You will be required to acknowledge that your company is duly authorized to do business, that you are solvent enough to enter into an agreement, and the invoices you are factoring are legitimately owed debts to your company. The factoring company will make similar warranties about their solvency and authorization to enter into a contract with you.

Defaults and Termination of Agreement

This section of the contract deals with when a contract may be terminated, what events could result in your being in default of your contract, and what notices are required to inform the factor of your intent to terminate the contract. This is typically done only when a long-term contract is necessary and may not be included in spot factoring contracts.

Security Interest in Receivables

The contract will spell out the factoring companies interest in your receivables. This section of the contract will prohibit you from factoring the same receivables with another company or using the same receivables as a security interest in any other type of loan arrangement.

Conclusion of Factoring Agreements

Whenever a company has decided to borrow against invoices, there will be a contract involved. Your contract will be unique to the agreement you reach with the factor including what the term of the contract is, what fees are paid, and what will occur should your client default on an invoice. Be sure you understand the terms and conditions you are agreeing to.

If you are considering working with a factoring company to help improve your cash flow, contact Capstone Capital Group today. You can reach us by filling out our online contact form, by calling us at 347-410-9894, or by email at [email protected]

Understanding Non Recourse Factoring

12:21 16 April in Blog, Business Funding

Like any type of financing, accounts receivable factoring is a risk taken by the factoring company. In most cases, accounts receivable factoring is based on the creditworthiness of the underlying customer. Therefore, a factoring company does not provide financing for invoices that are made to an individual customer, instead they provide funding against invoices made to other companies, or to government entities. This is why we need to understand non recourse factoring.

Collection Activities and B2B Transactions

Typically, when businesses are completing transactions, they offer terms that may give a company up to 90 days to make payment.

In some instances, they offer discounts if an invoice is paid sooner. In the case where a company has opted to factor their accounts receivable, they turn the risk, and collection activities over to the factoring company. However, what happens when the customer does not pay their invoice?

If a company is managing their own accounts receivable, they may put forward demand notices, and hold the company responsible for paying the invoice with certain late charges which are normally laid out in their contract. Many contracts also have a recourse clause which may hold the company owners accountable personally for unpaid bills.

If payments are not made as agreed, you would typically stop doing business with the company until the invoice was paid in full. Chances are, you would likely require a deposit or full payment before doing additional business with the company. This is known as full recourse.

Meaning of Non Recourse Factoring

But, what happens if you are working with a factor and they have offered to factor your receivables with no recourse?

First, it is important to understand what no recourse means. In most factoring contracts, no recourse usually means that the factoring company will not seek payment from you under certain conditions.

The typical condition is the insolvency of the customer that occurs during the time of the factoring period.

For example, if you have issued an invoice that is due in 90 days, and a factoring company has advanced you cash against that invoice, the company would have to go out of business during the 90 day period between issuing the invoice and having the payment due.

What Non Recourse Factoring Does Not Cover

Even if your factoring company has agreed to factor your receivables without recourse, there are certain exclusions which you should be aware of. For example, in most cases, factoring advances will not be considered without recourse if:

  • There is a dispute over an invoice – if you have issued an invoice and your customer disputes the invoice, chances are, the factoring company will not allow you to walk away from the debt you incurred because of factoring.
  • You deliver products to non-paying customers – if you have a customer who has been consistently late paying invoices and you are still delivering product to them, you are increasing their outstanding amount owed, meaning the factoring company is at even more risk of losing money. Most of the time, you will be held responsible for these invoices.
  • You owe the company money – if you have a reciprocal arrangement with a company you do business with, and the company credits amounts you owe them against amounts they owe you, the factoring company may not grant you the ability to factor those invoices without recourse.

When entering into a factoring contract, it is important to understand the terms you are agreeing to abide by.

We make sure our contracts are easy to understand and you understand whether you are accepting funding against your receivables with or without recourse.

Capstone is a private finance company offering various solutions to businesses to provide them with more consistent cash flow.

Contact us today to request funding or to speak with one of our representatives to learn more about how Capstone can help your business grow and flourish.

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Indianapolis Manufacturers Express Concern Over Presidential Trade Platform

16:03 15 August in Blog

In a state where manufacturing is an economic support beam, Indiana businesses are growing more and more concerned over the presidential race’s implications for trade.

Former IN Governor Mike Pence ran his 2012 gubernatorial campaign on a strongly pro-trade platform and voted for every available free trade initiative during his House of Representative’s tenure. However, his alliance with presidential running mate Donald Trump — who has strongly condemned international trade agreements — now has businesses skeptical of his commitment to their interests.

The other side of the aisle presents little comfort, given Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s recent sharp trade critiques. In an August statement to The Indianapolis Star, local international sales manager Nate LaMar expressed a concern that both presidential candidates wanted to “turn back the clock” on trade systems.

The big question is this: what impact would revisions to long-standing international trade deals like NAFTA have on small businesses and manufacturers – especially those in states like Indiana.

Local Economics to National Concerns

Indiana has the highest distribution of manufacturing professionals in its workforce among American states. It also owes a great deal of its post-Great Recession recovery to a rebound in exports in products like pork, corn, and soybeans. Economists say that the state’s high level of factory competitiveness led to this advantageous performance after the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) opened up Mexican markets.

Changing Tides

Pence’s pro-trade convictions have taken on some damage in recent months, beginning with Indianapolis heating giant Carrier Corp.’s relocation to Mexico. After accepting the Republican vice-presidential nomination, Pence receded from his previous stance: he has now backed away from both NAFTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), an agreement that would lower trade barriers between America and a host of nations. For Indiana exporters — many of whom are owned or invested in by Japanese entities — this reticence signals a worrying lack of concern for his former constituency’s best interests.

Pence explicitly distanced himself from the TPP on the Laura Ingraham radio show, stating that it was time to “rethink” NAFTA’s implications and “hit the brakes” on TPP, dealing with Asian and Pacific Rim countries on a case by case basis to “promote growth.”

As a more “isolationist” wave sweeps the nation, manufacturers across the country will have to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. For now, all eyes are on the presidential election.

Accelerate Your Working Capital with Capstone

For qualified clients, Capstone provides single invoice factoring, purchase order factoring and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage or contact us directly for more information.

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4 Things You Didn’t Know about US Manufacturing

09:37 15 July in Blog

As we discussed in a recent blog, US manufacturing is alive and well—despite what many people may think. Following up on that piece, we are happy to give yet another positive update from the manufacturing sector.

The stars have aligned for US manufacturing in July, with domestic demand strengthening and offsetting the relative strength of the US dollar. US manufacturing activity hit a 9-month high in July, dispelling fears that the UK’s decision to leave the EU would hurt the already poorly performing sector. Factors that are boosting US manufacturing activity include a strong housing market, strong automobile demand, and solid consumer spending: all of which help to increase spending on manufactured goods.

US Manufacturing: Down and Out or Just Different?

It’s true that today’s manufacturing landscape is quite different from that of 1950. It’s even changed significantly since the year 2000, having shed 5 million jobs since the turn of the century. But what many people don’t realize is that it’s not only US manufacturing that’s being transformed. Technological advancements have made it possible to increase production with fewer workers. The end result is a strong (albeit much quieter) manufacturing sector that increasingly relies on tools like invoice factoring to increase working capital and expand business.

Surprising Facts about US Manufacturing

Here are four things you probably didn’t know about US manufacturing.

  1. Most US manufacturing firms are small; 75% have less than 20 employees, and 99% have less than 500.
  2. The US boasts 12 million manufacturing workers —9% of the entire workforce
  3. The average manufacturing worker earned over $4 more an hour than the US average — $25.58 compared to $21.32.
  4. Many manufacturing companies use invoice factoring to boost cash flow and expand their business

Boosting Working Capital with Capstone

For qualified clients, Capstone provides single invoice and contractor factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage or contact us directly for more information.

Stake for Small Business Owners this Election Season

What’s at Stake for Small Business Owners this Election Season

19:40 29 June in Blog

Stake for Small Business Owners this Election SeasonU.S. presidential elections are a marathon, not a sprint, and this race has been exceptionally grueling—both for the candidates and the public at large. But more concerned than the average U.S. citizen are small business owners, who have responded to the uncertainty by delaying new hires, forgoing new equipment orders, and avoiding all but the most essential investments. We’ll tell you why confidence is slipping and what small businesses can do to buck the trend.

An Unprecedented Election Season?

Every presidential election captures the nation’s attention, but this year’s race seems to have no precedent. Whereas most Americans tune into the race after the primaries are over and the Republicans and Democrats have chosen their respective nominees, both parties saw unconventional candidates challenge the status quo during the primaries and capture the attention—and votes—of millions. Now that the primaries are over and Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are set to face off in the general election, the future and the direction we’re heading remains as unclear as ever.

Small Business Owners Uncertain

According to a survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal and Vistage Worldwide Inc, one-third of business owners report that uncertainty over the coming election is negatively impacting their business.

Though small business owners are responding in different ways, the overarching theme is this: they have opportunities to grow their businesses, but they’re hesitant to spend the money. It’s not just the election causing concerns—there’s also global concerns, like the recent exit of the U.K. from the European Union, which threw global markets into a brief tailspin and the tenuous state of the Chinese economy. Closer to home, there’s also uncertainty over the timing and impact of future interest rate hikes.

Small-Business Confidence, by the Numbers

Given the picture we’ve just painted, it’s no surprise that small-business confidence fell to its lowest level since November of 2012 this month. Even industries that consider themselves ‘immune’ to political drama, like real estate, construction and development, are seeing activity dwindle. In the end, small businesses off all types face higher cost of capital than their larger counterparts, and that’s why they bear the lion’s share of the burden when uncertainty prevails and consumers reduce spending.

Luckily, there are several tools that small businesses can use to seize opportunities for growth—regardless of the prevailing political and economic climate.

Capstone Helps Small Businesses Boost Working Capital and Grow

For qualified clients, Capstone provides purchase order factoring, single invoice factoring, and full-contract factoring for work performed under contract with credit-worthy accounts. We have highly experienced professionals on staff to facilitate the purchase of work in progress and progress billing-related accounts receivable. Please visit our homepage or contact us directly for more information.

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